Helping Our Children Make Career Decisions

From the time a child is little, one common question they hear is, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” During their teen years, this question becomes much more important to them, and many begin to stress out over the answer. How can we help our children as they deal with this major life decision? First, remember to pray for the Lord to give them the guidance they need and give you the wisdom to help along the way.scholarships for college

One of the best things we found for our girls was allowing them to be involved in a variety of activities as they grew up. The more things they did, the more they learned about themselves and what they could do. I believe that community service is a great way to learn about what you might want to do. While serving others, my girls learned about what they were good at and what they enjoyed doing. Look for more information on this subject under the heading, “Getting Your Child Involved”.

There are many helpful websites that can be of assistance as you direct your child. Spend some time looking over these for some help:

www.learning4liferesources.com/index.html
This is an excellent Christian site from the Learning for Life Resource Center

www.jobhuntersbible.com
This is a great site from the man who wrote “What Color is Your Parachute”, Dick Bolles. There are lots of great things on the site, but be sure to go to Tests & Advice for some career tests and personality tests.

www.jobstar.org
Has some career guides and offers a free online career test.

www.uncwil.edu/stuaff/career/majors
This is from the University of North Carolina.
This site offers information on “What Can I Do With a Major in.”

www.careerkey.org/english
This site also offers a free test for career guidance

www.advisorteam.com/temperament_sorter
Offers a free online temperament test with matching career options.

www.ipl.org/div/pathways
This is from the Internet Public Library, and offers some free tests to help narrow down your choices

Also, your child could take the PLAN test which is an ACT pretest taken by Sophomores. Part of this exam is questions that help determine what careers might be a good fit for the student. This might give some early information on what courses should be pursued, but personally I think this may be a little early for the student to have clear direction.

Childhood obesity: Early years a ‘critical window’

At Shining Stars Family Child Care in San Francisco, toddlers and preschoolers celebrate birthdays with quinoa cakes sweetened only with sweet potatoes.

There’s no juice at snack time. Instead, the children sip water flavored with berries or cucumbers.

And they do work up a thirst, salsa dancing and running around the center’s backyard.

The children may not know they are engaged in an obesity prevention program backed by research. They just know “they love it,” Shining Stars owner Zonia Torres says.

Researchers say an early embrace of healthy habits is a key ingredient in tackling an urgent problem: excess weight gain in very young children.

Researchers have long known that heavy children often grow up to become heavy teens and adults. The latest research, a study that followed 50,000 German children, found an especially strong risk when children gain weight too rapidly from ages 2 to 6.

An early weight surge “is the most powerful predictor of subsequent obesity in adolescence,” says Michael Freemark, a professor of pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine.

The longer a child stays heavy, the more likely the pounds are to stick, says Freemark, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Many obese adults were never obese children, he says, but obese children and teens are at very high risk for becoming obese adults.

Researchers do not know how much of the extra risk is genetic and how much is driven by unhealthy habits and exposure to fast foods, comfy sofas and alluring screens. It’s possible, Freemark says, that an early weight surge changes the body in ways that make it harder to control weight later.

For the next nine months, USA TODAY plans to explore the health challenges that confront people in all 50 states. This story is second in that series. The first was on Alzheimer’s.

Nearly 40 percent of adults are obese, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hopes for a decline in young children were dashed by a study by the American Academy of Pediatrics that found 15 percent of children ages 2 to 5 were obese in 2015-16, up from 11 percent in 2013-14.

A more encouraging survey, from the federal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), found that the obesity rate among low-income children ages 2 to 4 enrolled in that program fell to 14.5 percent in 2014, down from 15.9 percent in 2010. The next round of WIC data, from 2016, has not been released.

Whatever the exact numbers, Freemark wrote in his editorial, it’s clear that “we are now witness to an evolving epidemic of childhood obesity” that’s putting youngsters at risk for eventual complications ranging from type 2 diabetes to fatty liver disease.

The early years are a critical window, he says, and perhaps the best time to prevent harm.

3 takeaways from the Bruins’ 6-3 loss to the Avalanche

The 6-3 loss to the Colorado Avalanche hurt, but the Boston Bruins had a bigger setback Wednesday night — both figuratively and literally.

Here is what we learned as the Black and Gold saw a two-goal lead evaporate into a three-goal loss in the Mile High City.

Bruins blue-line takes another BIG hit
Remember when the Bruins had a good problem with extra defensive depth? That’s nothing but a distant memory now.

Conspicuous by his absence to start the second period, Bruins fans were hoping that Zdeno Chara could overcome a tough first-period hit from former teammate Carl Soderberg and return to the ice sheet. He didn’t. The B’s ruled Chara out for the remainder of the contest with a lower-body injury.
Even with a two-goal lead following Jake DeBrusk’s second of the night, the Bruins certainly could’ve used their 6-foot-9 captain against a high-octane Avalanche squad. The B’s went from the being in the driver’s seat to holding on for dear life as the Avs occupied the front of the net and found time and space in Chara’s absence. Indeed, the task was too tall to overcome as Colorado’s top line sparked the team to five unanswered goals.

Chara’s exit adds to the ever-growing defensive injury list that includes upper-body ailments to Brandon Carlo and Kevan Miller along with concussions to Charlie McAvoy and Urho Vaakanainen.

Jakub Zboril earned a promotion to the big club for this road trip. His NHL debut could come Friday depending on Chara’s status.

The Bruins will dress Zboril, Torey Krug, John Moore, Matt Grzelcyk, Jeremy Lauzon and Steven Kampfer for their back-to-back slate in Dallas (Friday) and Arizona (Saturday) barring any developments.

Avs top line outshines Bruins top trio
“They are an amazing line. They are playing with amazing pace and tempo but also making great plays and obviously, they have a great team over there. It is going to be a tough matchup for sure,” Patrice Bergeron said about the Avs top line of captain Gabriel Landeskog, second-year sensation Mikko Rantanen and reigning Hart Trophy finalist Nathan MacKinnon.