Tankless Water Heaters – Service – Repair – Replace

Have you ever thought about getting a tankless water heater, based off a plumber’s recommendation? Tankless water heaters are definitely something you should be looking into.tankless water heaters

Tankless water heaters, sometimes known as instantaneous, continuous flow or inline are the perfect alternative to conventional tank heaters.

They heat liquids on demand or instantly rather than keeping liquids in reserve like conventional tank heaters. They use less energy than tank heaters which in turns means lower energy bills for you.

They can be operated electrically or with natural gas or propane. Gas ones can heat more liquid faster while electric ones need access to a lot of electric power to rapidly heat water.

They are very efficient when it comes to energy conservative. They have efficiency ratings at nearly 99%.

Most supply hot water for the whole house including appliances. The ones that supply hot water for the whole house are largest of the heaters. Point-of-use tankless water heaters are smaller units and can be placed under sinks or other easy access areas.

Point-of-use tankless water heater units provide hot water for a specific outlet versus the whole house. They are located right where the water is being used and save more energy than centrally installed tankless water heaters, but are usually used in combination with a central water heater because of their small tank size.

Generally speaking, they are good choices because they don’t take up much space and can be hidden out of site. So, you won’t have to worry about people looking at it.

Here are a few reasons why you should look into them…

• Unlimited hot water – As liquid is heated while passing through the system an unlimited supply of hot water is available with a tankless water heater however, this can also be a disadvantage as running out of hot water self-limits use while a tankless heater has no such limit.water heater repair

• Size – They can be mounted under a sink, in an easy access area, or anywhere else you think would be a good location. Because there is no tank, the places of where it can go are virtually endless.

• Water damage is minimized – They have no tanks to store liquid, so there are no chances of water damage do to a leak or hole in the tank. There are still risks of water damage from faulty parts such as improper piping or bad fittings.

• Longevity – They have no tanks meaning they will outlast the conventional water heater twice as many years because corrosion is due to standing water in the tank. The corrosion will be on the pipes or around the fittings vs. the tank.

• Environmentally Friendly – They are designed to only use gas and water when they are being used. Therefore, you are not wasting resources to heat the water in a conventional heater.

Childhood obesity: Early years a ‘critical window’

At Shining Stars Family Child Care in San Francisco, toddlers and preschoolers celebrate birthdays with quinoa cakes sweetened only with sweet potatoes.

There’s no juice at snack time. Instead, the children sip water flavored with berries or cucumbers.

And they do work up a thirst, salsa dancing and running around the center’s backyard.

The children may not know they are engaged in an obesity prevention program backed by research. They just know “they love it,” Shining Stars owner Zonia Torres says.

Researchers say an early embrace of healthy habits is a key ingredient in tackling an urgent problem: excess weight gain in very young children.

Researchers have long known that heavy children often grow up to become heavy teens and adults. The latest research, a study that followed 50,000 German children, found an especially strong risk when children gain weight too rapidly from ages 2 to 6.

An early weight surge “is the most powerful predictor of subsequent obesity in adolescence,” says Michael Freemark, a professor of pediatrics at Duke University School of Medicine.

The longer a child stays heavy, the more likely the pounds are to stick, says Freemark, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, published this month in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Many obese adults were never obese children, he says, but obese children and teens are at very high risk for becoming obese adults.

Researchers do not know how much of the extra risk is genetic and how much is driven by unhealthy habits and exposure to fast foods, comfy sofas and alluring screens. It’s possible, Freemark says, that an early weight surge changes the body in ways that make it harder to control weight later.

For the next nine months, USA TODAY plans to explore the health challenges that confront people in all 50 states. This story is second in that series. The first was on Alzheimer’s.

Nearly 40 percent of adults are obese, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hopes for a decline in young children were dashed by a study by the American Academy of Pediatrics that found 15 percent of children ages 2 to 5 were obese in 2015-16, up from 11 percent in 2013-14.

A more encouraging survey, from the federal Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC), found that the obesity rate among low-income children ages 2 to 4 enrolled in that program fell to 14.5 percent in 2014, down from 15.9 percent in 2010. The next round of WIC data, from 2016, has not been released.

Whatever the exact numbers, Freemark wrote in his editorial, it’s clear that “we are now witness to an evolving epidemic of childhood obesity” that’s putting youngsters at risk for eventual complications ranging from type 2 diabetes to fatty liver disease.

The early years are a critical window, he says, and perhaps the best time to prevent harm.

3 takeaways from the Bruins’ 6-3 loss to the Avalanche

The 6-3 loss to the Colorado Avalanche hurt, but the Boston Bruins had a bigger setback Wednesday night — both figuratively and literally.

Here is what we learned as the Black and Gold saw a two-goal lead evaporate into a three-goal loss in the Mile High City.

Bruins blue-line takes another BIG hit
Remember when the Bruins had a good problem with extra defensive depth? That’s nothing but a distant memory now.

Conspicuous by his absence to start the second period, Bruins fans were hoping that Zdeno Chara could overcome a tough first-period hit from former teammate Carl Soderberg and return to the ice sheet. He didn’t. The B’s ruled Chara out for the remainder of the contest with a lower-body injury.
Even with a two-goal lead following Jake DeBrusk’s second of the night, the Bruins certainly could’ve used their 6-foot-9 captain against a high-octane Avalanche squad. The B’s went from the being in the driver’s seat to holding on for dear life as the Avs occupied the front of the net and found time and space in Chara’s absence. Indeed, the task was too tall to overcome as Colorado’s top line sparked the team to five unanswered goals.

Chara’s exit adds to the ever-growing defensive injury list that includes upper-body ailments to Brandon Carlo and Kevan Miller along with concussions to Charlie McAvoy and Urho Vaakanainen.

Jakub Zboril earned a promotion to the big club for this road trip. His NHL debut could come Friday depending on Chara’s status.

The Bruins will dress Zboril, Torey Krug, John Moore, Matt Grzelcyk, Jeremy Lauzon and Steven Kampfer for their back-to-back slate in Dallas (Friday) and Arizona (Saturday) barring any developments.

Avs top line outshines Bruins top trio
“They are an amazing line. They are playing with amazing pace and tempo but also making great plays and obviously, they have a great team over there. It is going to be a tough matchup for sure,” Patrice Bergeron said about the Avs top line of captain Gabriel Landeskog, second-year sensation Mikko Rantanen and reigning Hart Trophy finalist Nathan MacKinnon.